World Maker Faire 2013: Liquid Metal 3D Printing

Scott Vader and his son Zachary showed a early prototype model of their Liquid Metal Jet Printer.

Although the printer was non-functional at Maker Faire, Vader, with over 30 years experience in manufacturing and engineering speaks with a lot of confidence and is sure he will be able to bring the product to market in the near future.

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World Maker Faire 2013: Huge 3D Printed Dragon

This supersized dragon model was printed on one of the early Makerbot printers. In order to accomplish the task, it was broken down into over 100 separate pieces that were then glued together.

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World Maker Faire 2013: Innovative New 3D Printer Design

Nicholas Seward at ConceptForge gave us a demonstration of "WALLY", an innovative new 3D RepRap design at Maker Faire.

WALLY uses a SCARA/pantograph approach that totally eliminates linear rails, appears to be more compact, and is able to print parts for a next generation copy/clone that is 20% larger than itself. According to Seward the process can be repeated with each generation being as much as 20% larger than it's predecessor.

The part print quality was a bit rough, but Seward explained that the prototype WALLY on display had only been running for 3 days. He expects the print quality to match other 3D printer designs on the market after he has a few weeks for fine-tuning.

WALLY features a 3/8" water jet cut basalt bed with a laser cut registration grid; Anubis hotend equipped with a FEP Bowden tube (similar to Tantillus) that minimizes the print head mass resulting in smoother prints; linear motion drive utilizing 100lb test braided fishing line (another design approach similar to Tantillus); and is wall mountable.

The print envelope is 200 mm in diameter by 150 mm tall. The printer is designed to use 1.75mm PLA filament, though it could probably be modified for use with other filament sizes or types.

Seward estimates that WALLY will cost USD$450 for a "print your own" version and plans to offer a full kit priced around USD$600.

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World Maker Faire 2013: 3D Printed “Pot Head”

It's surprising how rapidly the capability and capacity of affordable 3D printers has increased.

There were several exhibitors at Maker Faire in NYC last week showing off printers with print envelopes large enough to print really big objects. Of course the print times can be extremely long, and there is also the issue of warping with large parts. Still, the results were very impressive and encouraging.

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NAO Humanoid Robot User Meeting – Tokyo

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Had a great time this morning peeking in on the Aldebaran NAO Humanoid Robot User Meeting held in Tokyo.

Lots of neat demos, and tons of enthusiasm. It's always terrific to be with a group of people that obviously enjoy what they are doing and want to share it with others.

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Robots are Poor Tippers…

Robots are Poor Tippers by WooWork.com
Robots are Poor Tippers, a photo by WooWork.com on Flickr.

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