We the Geeks: “Don’t Be Bored, Make Something” – White House Google+ Hangout Tuesday

We the Geeks  Don t Be Bored Make Something | The White House

Look what the White House just announced for Tuesday afternoon (ET):

Have you ever considered what you might create with a state-of-the-art digital design studio? Have you ever thought about planning and printing a new pair of sneakers, instead of just buying some? Have you ever dreamt about what you would make if you had all the tools of industrial design at your fingertips?

Well, those dreams may be closer than you think.

A new generation of American pioneers is democratizing the tools of the industrial revolution and spreading them to students around the country. But these tools aren’t the rusty machines you might imagine – they’re 3-D printers, laser cutters, and water jets, and they give you the ability to make almost anything. Not only that, they may be coming soon to a school near you.

Announcing the first ever White House Science Fair, the President called for an all hands on deck approach to grow a generation of Americans who are, “the makers of things, and not just the consumers of things.” And at the 2012 White House Science Fair, the President met student Joey Hudy and launched his marshmallow cannon, noting that Joey’s motto was, “Don’t be bored, make something.” Responding to that call, citizens, communities, and organizations are coming together to give students the tools to design with their minds and make with their hands.

Join us and leading tinkerers, educators, and innovators on Tuesday, November 12th, at 2:00 pm EST for a “We the Geeks” Google+ Hangout, called “Don’t Be Bored, Make Something”.

The Hangout will be moderated by Kumar Garg, Assistant Director for Learning and Innovation, and Cristin Dorgelo, Assistant Director for Grand Challenges, and will feature a panel of these leading experts:

Hear from the people building the next generation of shop class by tuning into "We the Geeks: Don’t be Bored, Make Something" live on WhiteHouse.gov/WeTheGeeks and the White House Google+ page on Tuesday, November 12, at 2:00 pm EDT.

Got comments or questions? Ask them using the hashtag #WeTheGeeks on Twitter and on Google+ and we'll answer some of them during the live Hangout.

 

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Tears of Steel – Robot Evolution Remix (Video)

Tears of Steel  Robot Evolution Remix  YouTube

Robert Roschler,  a good friend, fellow robot designer, and AI researcher, put together this impressive remix of "Tears of Steel". Just to be clear, the video footage and impressive animation was done by the Blender Foundation and Robert is using it in accordance with the appropriate derivative license terms and conditions. At the same time, he is the creator, author, and performer of the song "Evolution".

 Robert is one of those rare individuals that that is been able to bridge the gap between left brain right brain individuals merging his grasp of both the technical realm and the artistic. He loves creating a fusion of robotics and automation with the performing arts. In fact, that unique talent inspired him many years ago to create the RoboDance project.

That project, which was primarily self-funded by Robert himself, enabled people to create complex dance and performance sequences with computer assistance utilising low-cost robots like the Robosapien. He doesn't let artificial constraints stand in the way of creativity. In fact he sees it as a challenge to apply technology in new ways to create his visions.

Here are the reference links provided by Robert:

Remix of the amazing Tears of Steel animation video by the Blender Foundation. Video footage and some sound effects are used in accordance with the Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution license the video was released. This license allows content usage in both commercial and non-commercial derivative works as long as proper attribution is given. My personal thanks to the creative geniuses at the Blender Foundation for this latest open source project in a series of true gems that they have released over the years. To see the original film in its entirety please visit:

http://mango.blender.org/

The song "Evolution" is an original work and not part of the Tears of Steel project, (c) Android Technologies, Inc. For more information visit:

http://robotsrule.com/

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Using 3D Printing for Practical Designs

IPhone Lens 3D printing

Design World has an online webinar scheduled for next Tuesday, December 4th, featuring Chong Pak of Olloclip explaining how they used 3D printing technology to design and manufacture their 3-in-one lens system for the iPhone camera. According to the webinar registration webpage:

"Olloclip has created the ultimate 3-in-one lens system for your iPhone that fits in your pocket and takes your picture taking ability to the next level. Product design in the most recent years has been impacted tremendously by 3D printing and Olloclip’s camera lenses are no different. Whether it’s wide angle, fish eye or a macro picture view, this development in camera phone technology has been made possible by Objet 3D Printing. Please join Chong Pak of Olloclip and Objet Geometries as they discuss product design within the iPhone era and how 3D printing can help engineers design, create and ultimately bring products to life faster.

Attend this webinar to learn about:
-Olloclip and their fast hitting iPhone accessory
-3D printing and the design process
-Objet’s multi-platform capabilities"

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Makerbot Replicator vs. Lulzbot A0-100 (Video)

3D printer review

I'm not sure what Andrew Mazzotta does for a living, but I do know that he has a boatload of 3D printers and is racking up numerous hours testing and evaluating them, which is all to the good.

This week he compares the Makerbot Replicator to the Lulzbot AO-100, and throws in a few comments about the Uprint SE Plus for good measure. It's not a rigorous, detailed evaluation, but is quite valuable since it's based on his actual experience as a user of all three printers.

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DARPA $50,000 Paper Shredder Challenge

Darpa Paper Shredder

DARPA, the same folks that brought us, or at least funded, the development of the Internet and several autonomous robotic vehicles, has a new challenge. If you like puzzles, mental gymnastics, and extremely short deadlines, you're going to love this one.

It turns out that the US military frequently takes over the headquarters of hostile forces, but all too often all the critical paperwork containing precious clues and insights has been shredded before they can get their hands on it. That's where the DARPA challenge comes in. They're putting up a $50,000 prize for the team that can come up with the best solution for putting all the shredded information back together again.

Rather than just present one puzzle, which might be too difficult for any team to solve, DARPA has posted five puzzles with increasing levels of complexity. The puzzles are already up on the challenge website, and can be downloaded by anyone, even if they decide not to enter the competition.

To keep things even more interesting and exciting, they have a Leaderboard on the website that is updated regularly. The winning team will be announced on December 5, 2011.

(Via DARPA Shredder Challenge.)

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Affordable Stretch Sensor from AdaFruit Industries

Adafruit stretch sensor

I'm so incredibly jealous. Lady Ada over at AdaFruit Industries has all these great toys to play and experiment with, and she's figured out how to do it while enriching all of our hacker lives and making a little money to find more great stuff.

The 'toy' that triggered this post for me is some conductive rubber stretch cord that acts as a sensor. It's like being able to pull on the end of a resistor and have it's characteristics change linearly as it gets longer and shorter. Way cool! And it is incredibly cheap. She's priced it at less than ten dollars for a full meter and even includes a pair of alligator clips and a 10k resistor. Science teachers, for example, could dice it up and have enough for each student to have a piece for experiments.

The only drawback that I can see is that the sensor takes a little while to recover after being stretched, though I guess that could be compensated for in some applications by using two sensors in opposition.

As usual, the AdaFruit website has a great related tutorial page so you can learn while having fun.

(Via Conductive Rubber Cord Stretch Sensor + extras! ID: 519 - $9.95 : Adafruit Industries, Unique & fun DIY electronics and kits.)

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