Make: Robot Hacks Dives Deep Into InMoov, the Open Source 3D Printed Humanoid Robot (Video)

Robot Hacks InMoov  YouTube

Thanks to the Make: Robot Hacks series, hosted by Mike Senese, you can get an inside perspective on the development, trials and tribulations, and performance of Gael Langevin’s unique InMoov Open Source 3D printed humanoid robot.

Via: Robot Hacks | MAKE

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MakerBot Academy – Putting 3D Printers in All US Schools

Announcement | MakerBot Academy and America s Classrooms

Makerbot and America Makes jointly announced “Makerbot Academy”, a new initiative to support and strengthen American schools and STEM education. A big part of the initiative centres around giving students access to technology to foster interest, curiosity, and enthusiasm in STEM.

The new Makerbot Academy, with support from donors, plans to place thousands of 3D printers in schools across the nation. Here’s the opening text of the announcement:

We’re proud to announce MakerBot Academy, an educational mission to put a MakerBot® Desktop 3D Printer in every school in the United States of America.

The first MakerBot Academy initiative includes 3D printing bundles for classrooms, an awesome Thingiverse Challenge, and generous support from individuals and organizations.

What You Can Do

1. Get the word out. Tell the teachers you know to register at DonorsChoose.org.

2. Support a school. Contribute to the effort by choosing a teacher; help get them set for the Next Industrial Revolution.

3. Participate in the Thingiverse Challenge. Develop models that teachers can use to improve Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education.

Responding to a Presidential Call to Action

At this year’s State Of The Union address, President Obama announced a new initiative to bring manufacturing jobs back to the US. He affirmed, “3D printing has the potential to revolutionize the way we make almost everything. The next industrial revolution in manufacturing will happen in America.”

We’re inspired by the President’s commitment to keep America at the forefront of the Next Industrial Revolution and we’re eager to do our part to educate the next generation of innovative makers who will keep our economy strong.

Let’s Get MakerBot Desktop 3D Printers into American Schools

Together with America Makes, and by leveraging the crowdfunding power of DonorsChoose.org, we’re launching our first MakerBot Academy initiative:  Get thousands of MakerBot® Replicator® 2 Desktop 3D Printers into K-12 public school classrooms across the country — by December 31, 2013!

Via: Announcement | MakerBot Academy and America’s Classrooms

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NEC Announces New PaPeRo Petit Communication Robot and Partner Program (Video)

 画像 NEC 卓上サイズの小型ロボット PaPeRo petit を発表 ~クラウドを活用した PaPeRoパートナープログラム も募集開始  PC Watch

NEC is promoting PaPeRo Petit, the new mini-sized implementation of their well known but little utilised PaPeRo service robot, and the PaPeRo Partner Program.

The PaPeRo concept, which featured built-in cameras, 8 microphones with direction detection, touch sensors, voice recognition, and other interactive features, was quite innovative when it was first announced many years ago. Now it seems a bit dated.

To refresh interest in PaPeRo, NEC announced that the system’s API will be disclosed to application partners, and that the system has been enhanced with substantial ‘cloud’ functionality. Their business plan projects 10 billion yen (USD$100 million) in total sales volume over the next three years, which has to be a typo since there way too many zeros in that number. They are targeting 100 companies as development/marketing/sales partners with the program.

PaPeRo Petit is roughly half the size of it’s larger older brother, the PaPeRo R500, and stands 24 cm tall while weighing in at 1.3 kg.

According to the NEC presentation material, the voice recognition reliability has achieved 90% on average, which they feel makes it practical for use in real world applications. I haven’t seen similar performance statistics for SIRI or Dragon Dictate, but based on my own experience, their performance is much better than 90%.

Here’s the earlier PaPeRo version (circa 2008) in action:

 

Via: "PaPeRo petit" and "PaPeRo Partner Program" - PC Watch

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Rapid 3d Printed Circuit Board System Promises a Wide Range of Substrates – Kickstarter

The EX¹  rapid 3D printing of circuit boards by Cartesian Co  Kickstarter

This Kickstarter project uses an innovative approach to produce 3D printed circuit boards on a wide range of different substrate materials.

It won’t meet everyone’s needs, and the long term reliability of the circuits it produces is still to be established, but if you do a lot of circuit board prototyping or want to explore more exotic applications like wearable electronics, this project might be just the ticket.

No etching, no harsh chemicals, and almost zero lead-time. Just print out your circuit board design using the two-pass system and you’re ready to install the components and test.

 

Via: The EX¹ - rapid 3D printing of circuit boards by Cartesian Co. — Kickstarter

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Robotis Darwin Mini Robot Plays Beach Flag (Video)

131024 RobotWorld Day One 29

The Robotis Darwin Mini humanoid robot is getting a lot of attention, even though it isn’t schedule to go on sale until sometime next year. The robot, which should set a new standard for outstanding price/performance, demonstrated its skill playing a Beach Flag game at a robot competition in Tokyo over the weekend:

Note: This is an early prototype of the robot, currently being evaluated by Sugiura Machine Design Office.

The robot will be open-source/open-hardware, enabling users to add their own functionality, sensors, and even design/create their own 3D printed shells. It’s expected to sell in the USD$500-$600 price range.

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We the Geeks: “Don’t Be Bored, Make Something” – White House Google+ Hangout Tuesday

We the Geeks  Don t Be Bored Make Something | The White House

Look what the White House just announced for Tuesday afternoon (ET):

Have you ever considered what you might create with a state-of-the-art digital design studio? Have you ever thought about planning and printing a new pair of sneakers, instead of just buying some? Have you ever dreamt about what you would make if you had all the tools of industrial design at your fingertips?

Well, those dreams may be closer than you think.

A new generation of American pioneers is democratizing the tools of the industrial revolution and spreading them to students around the country. But these tools aren’t the rusty machines you might imagine – they’re 3-D printers, laser cutters, and water jets, and they give you the ability to make almost anything. Not only that, they may be coming soon to a school near you.

Announcing the first ever White House Science Fair, the President called for an all hands on deck approach to grow a generation of Americans who are, “the makers of things, and not just the consumers of things.” And at the 2012 White House Science Fair, the President met student Joey Hudy and launched his marshmallow cannon, noting that Joey’s motto was, “Don’t be bored, make something.” Responding to that call, citizens, communities, and organizations are coming together to give students the tools to design with their minds and make with their hands.

Join us and leading tinkerers, educators, and innovators on Tuesday, November 12th, at 2:00 pm EST for a “We the Geeks” Google+ Hangout, called “Don’t Be Bored, Make Something”.

The Hangout will be moderated by Kumar Garg, Assistant Director for Learning and Innovation, and Cristin Dorgelo, Assistant Director for Grand Challenges, and will feature a panel of these leading experts:

Hear from the people building the next generation of shop class by tuning into "We the Geeks: Don’t be Bored, Make Something" live on WhiteHouse.gov/WeTheGeeks and the White House Google+ page on Tuesday, November 12, at 2:00 pm EDT.

Got comments or questions? Ask them using the hashtag #WeTheGeeks on Twitter and on Google+ and we'll answer some of them during the live Hangout.

 

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