DARWIN MINI Humanoid Robot Assembly (Photo Gallery)

DARWIN MINI

The new DARWIN MINI humanoid robot from Robotis is definitely the easiest, and most straight forward, assembly process I’ve ever experienced. Over the years I’ve assembled about a dozen different humanoid robots from manufacturers all over the world. As far as assembly is concerned, the DARWIN MINI beats them all, hands down.

Here’s a photo gallery with detailed images documenting the entire process:

Via: DARWIN MINI Humanoid Robot - a set on Flickr

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • email
  • LinkedIn
  • Slashdot
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us

Chogokin Hello Kitty to Hit the Market this Summer (video)

Hello kitty

Bandai announced that "Chogokin Hello Kitty” with Rocket Punch will go on sale in Japan this June. Pricing and availability outside the country isn't available at this time.

Hello kitty robot

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • email
  • LinkedIn
  • Slashdot
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us

Robi Robot Credit Card Promotion

robot credit card

Deagostini Japan and Mitsui Sumitomo bank are introducing a Robi branded VISA credit card in Japan next month. The introductory campaign includes Robi branded items including a mini Robi figure and Quo prepaid cards featuring an original Robi design.

Needless to say, the promotion is only open to Japan residents.

Via: Deagostini Japan Robi VISA Card

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • email
  • LinkedIn
  • Slashdot
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us

AdaFruit Industries Hits 400,000 Order Milestone

adafruit

 
Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • email
  • LinkedIn
  • Slashdot
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us

Rethink Robotics Rethinks Its Strategy and Tactics

Layoffs at Rethink Boston maker of manufacturing robots  Innovation Economy  Boston com 1

It’s an age-old, or at least decades-old, story. A startup company, based on exciting technology and full of enthusiasm, comes roaring out of the gate ready to set the world on fire. They garner tons of media attention, recruit some of the top people in the industry, attract healthy amounts of venture capital, and proceed full speed ahead. Then at some point, often three or four years into their evolution, they are forced by the realities of product and market development to “select and focus”. They realise that they can’t develop a viable, sustainable business trying to do too many things at once.

Rethink Robotics, one of the most exciting and innovative robotics companies to appear over the past six years, apparently reached that stage this week and has announced significant layoffs amounting to almost a quarter of their estimated headcount.

According to a report on Boston.com, Rethink Robotics CEO Scott Eckert said that -

"...the layoffs are the result of Rethink deciding to focus on the market segments that have been most receptive to Baxter since its launch, including plastics manufacturing, consumer goods, and warehousing and logistics. Rethink has also been selling Baxter to academic and corporate research labs in the U.S. and overseas."

A restructuring of this magnitude, while certainly a concern, isn’t that unusual for high tech startups during this phase of their development. In fact, if managed properly, it can be quite healthy and could put the company in a much stronger position in the long term.

At the same time there is a significant risk that some customers may have a degree of trepidation about committing to the Rethink Robotics design approach, especially for robot implementations that are mission critical for their companies. Robotics, unlike software applications or consumer electronics, are used in critical parts of their customers manufacturing and supply chains.

Rethink represents a dramatic shift in the way that companies think about and implement robotics, and can potentially yield significant benefits. But before companies adopt the Rethink approach they have to be extremely confident that Rethink as a company will be around to support them.

In many ways it’s a chicken/egg problem, and one that we hope and expect will play out well for Rethink. Restructuring and refocusing is absolutely the right move at this point. They have the right technology at the right time in the right market. The opportunity is their’s to win, or to lose.

Via: Layoffs at Rethink, Boston maker of manufacturing robots - Innovation Economy - Boston.com

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • email
  • LinkedIn
  • Slashdot
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us

Robosavvy Robotics Founder Limor Schweitzer Featured on Fox Business (Video)

 Creating a robot with a 3D printer | Fox Business Video

Robosavvy founder Limor Schweitzer was featured on Fox Business discussing the impact of 3D printing on robot design and manufacturing.

Creating a robot with a 3D printer | Fox Business Video 1

Schweitzer compared the cost of some well known research robots, which can run from $30k to over $1 million, versus much more accessible 3D printed humanoids in the $1,000-$3,000 range.

Creating a robot with a 3D printer | Fox Business Video 2

To illustrate his points, Schweitzer brought along two robots - Franky, a surprisingly complex and capable humanoid (closeup below), and Fonzie, a dancing and entertainment humanoid featuring the 3D printed head of Jason Bradbury - host of the UK Gadget Show program.

Creating a robot with a 3D printer | Fox Business Video 3

Here’s the full interview:

 

 

 

 

Via: Creating a robot with a 3D printer | Fox Business Video

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • email
  • LinkedIn
  • Slashdot
  • StumbleUpon
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us