60 Minutes Segment on Robots and Jobs Stirs Controversy (Video)

 

Are robots hurting job growth  60 Minutes  CBS News

There is no question that rapidly advancing robot and AI technology are enabling companies to bring back work previously done overseas, especially in China. At the same time, they are eliminating the need for human involvement in the manufacturing and assembly processes, no matter where the 'manufacturing' takes place.

This excellent "Are Robots Hurting Job Growth?" segment on 60 Minutes explains the accelerating trend along with the benefits and the challenges it's creating. In the end, it may pose more of a severe problem for blue collar workers in China, India, and Asia than it will for their counterparts in 1st World nations, though no one will be able to completely escape its impact.

If I had to make one critical observation about the 60 minutes segment it would be to say that the title, "Are robots hurting job growth?", is misleading. To understand what is really taking place, and the eventual impact on individuals, governments, and societies, we need to take a much deeper, and more focused, approach. Robots, or more specifically 'robotics', is only a tool or technology.

The real 'problem', if we consider it to be a problem, is our focus on ever increasing efficiency and profitability, apparently without regard or a second thought to the impact on the quality of human life in general.

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Spark 181: A Future Vision for Subtile Human/Robot Interaction

human robot

Chris Parker, a post-doctoral researcher at the University of British Columbia in robotics, describes his vision of how robots and humans may be able to communicate in a subtle and natural way in the future making it easier for humans to understand and utilize their robotic assistants.

In addition to the nine minute segment that was broadcast during the weekly program, there is also a full uncut version of the interview available.

Via: Spark 181 – May 6 & 9, 2012 | Spark

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Do Robots Sweat Turing Tests?

Human IQ tests are hard enough, but not as hard as Turing tests for robots….

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NAO Robot In Training As Personal Assistant (Video)

nao robot calendar

While some robot developers are striving to create humanoid soccer players that will outperform their carbon based inventors, or are trying to bring their childhood robot heros, like Gundam, to life, Carl Clement in the UK is taking a much more pragmatic and perhaps humanistic/social approach. He's enrolled his NAO robot in a training regimen to become his personal secretary and assistant.

NAO Robot In Training As Personal Assistant (Video)’ continues

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Robot Learns, Thinks, and Acts By Itself (Video)

thinking learning robot

The Hasegawa Group located at the Tokyo Institute of technology has been able to integrate artificial intelligence into a semi-humanoid robot enabling it to think, learn, and act by itself. The robot uses a self-replicating neural network to learn in much the same way as its human counterparts.  It is able to extrapolate based on its past experience and knowledge combined with observation of its surrounding environment, then make educated guesses. In that sense, it learns from its mistakes, just like a child, and consistently corrects and adjusts until it can successfully perform required tasks.

Robot Learns, Thinks, and Acts By Itself (Video)’ continues

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