Device Enables Blind To See With Their Tongue (Video)

Thanks to Yuta Sugiura, we were alerted to the Brainport Vision Device that enables the blind to see using a small video camera, some electronics, and a custom device that ‘displays’ the visual information as electrical patterns on the tongue of the user.

Here’s the description from the YouTube video showing this amazing device:

“Watch as Erik Weihenmayer experiments with the Brainport Vision Device, a revolutionary new technology enabling a blind person to see with his tongue. Mounted on Weihenmayers head is a small video camera which translates visual information to a credit card-size tongue display. Four-hundred tiny pixels present electrical patterns on his tongue, which Weihenmayers brain then interprets as a visual picture in three-dimensional space. Watch as he uses the device to read words and numbers on note cards, to play tic-tac-toe and stone-paper-scissors with his daughter, and to rock climb. To learn more about Brainport, go to www.wicab.com. “

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One comment

  1. The name “ Brainport” reflects the major goal of this technology – to transfer into the human brain the flow of information from outside environment using as an alternative channel, human skin and the surface of the tongue for particular applications to help people who lost natural sensory systems (vision, hearing, vestibular). Even more, this technology applied as a unique machine-brain interface can extend human abilities in limitless applications for navigation (including firefighters and scuba divers), communication, entertainment and other areas of everyday life and human activities, see Danilov, Yuri, Tyler, Mitchell. BrainPort: an alternative input to the brain. Journal of Integrated Neuroscience, 2005, 4, 4, pp.1-14.

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