Accessing Technology Content Globally via Internet TV

robot

Living in Japan we tend to miss out on a lot of the neat US technology programs, and when they do happen to show up over here it's normally about two years after the original Stateside broadcast. Luckily the internet and video sharing technology is fixing that problem.

We just signed up with Miro, the free open source internet TV and video player. Did we mention that it's free? Frankly, we were totally astounded by the wealth of video content. Some of it's fairly shallow, but a lot of it is really worth watching, like the Wired Science programs, and the video presentations from the annual TED conferences. A typical example is this episode of Strange Science featuring COG, the advanced robot from MIT.

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  3. Why I started this blog
  4. A Great "On The Internet Nobody Knows" Photo
  5. Japanese Origami Expert Challenges CAD System To Create A Robot (Video link)
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2 comments

  1. Could you post the actual RSS feed address for “Strange Science” and any other science shows you found worth while for those of us who’ve just downloaded Miro?

  2. Daniel,

    I would be happy to post the RSS feed, once I figure out more about Miro. !8-)

    I just started using it myself a few days ago. While it is absolutely great, the RSS feeds aren’t obvious to me. The only way I’ve discovered new Miro channels and content is by using the Miro Guide within the application, then going through the category listings.

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